NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

NCERT Questions

In Text Questions

Question 1.
What changes would you make in your habits to become environment friendly ? (CBSE AI 2009)
Answer:
Three Rs — reduce, recycle and reuse.

  1. Reduce: It is to reduce consumption by preventing wastage.
    1. Switching off unnecessary lights, fans and other electrical appliances,
    2. Repair of leaky taps.
    3. Reducing food wastage,
    4. Walking down to nearby market instead of using vehicle.
  2. Recycle: Separation of recyclable wastes from non-recyclable wastes. The former are taken by rag pickers for sending them to industries involved in recycling, e.g., paper, plastic, metal, glass.
  3. Reuse: Carry bags, packing material, plastic containers and other reusable articles should not be thrown away if the same are uncontaminated. For example, plastic bottles and jars containing various food items brought from market can be washed and used for storing things in the kitchen.

Question 2.
What would be advantages of exploiting resources with short term aims ?
Answer:

  1. All the commodities for use and comforts for human society will become available in plenty.
  2. There will be rapid industrialisation and development.

Question 3.
How would these advantages differ from the advantages of using a long term prospective in managing our resources ?
Answer:

Short Term Aims Long Term Aims
1. All the commodities become available in plenty. 1. Availability of various commodities is restricted.
2. There is a tendency to manufacture articles of larger size. 2. There is a tendency to manufacture articles of smaller size.
3. The mentality is of use and throw. 3. The mentality is reuse, recycle and replace.
4. The resources are likely to get exhausted soon. 4. The resources are likely to remain available for a long time.
5. The ecology is disturbed and harmed. 5. It is eco-friendly.

 

Question 4.
Why do you think there should be equitable distribution of resources ? What forces would be working against an equitable distribution of our resources ?
Answer:
Need for Equitable Distribution. Resources are living and non-living components of nature which are drawn upon to provide food, fodder, shelter, water, energy, articles of daily use and comforts. Every human being has the fundamental right to obtain and use the same. This is possible only when there is equitable distribution of resources.
Forces Against Equitable Distribution,

  1. Restricted availability of resources,
  2. Excessive consumption by the rich,
  3. Profit motto by the persons exploiting resources.

Question 5.
Why should we conserve forests and wildlife ?
Answer:
There are economic and ecological reasons to conserve forests and wildlife.

  1. Economic Reasons:
    1. Forests are a source of shelter, food and fodder to people living in and around forests,
    2. They provide firewood and timber,
    3. A number of industrial raw materials are obtained from forests, e.g., tannins, dyes, resins, perfumes, wood for paper,
    4. Several medicines are got from forest plants and animals,
    5. Wildlife is a gene bank for improvement of domesticated plants and animals,
    6. All plants and animals have not yet been explored for their potential uses.
  2. Ecological Reasons:
    1. They regulate climate,
    2. Forests help in retaining rain water and its storage in aquifers from where water becomes available to springs and streams,
    3. Forests control soil erosion and prevent the occurrence of floods,
    4. Wildlife is essential for maintaining the forests.
    5. CO2-O2 balance is maintained.

Question 6.
Suggest some approaches towards the conservation of forests.
Answer:
Conservation is protection, augmentation and scientific management of a resource so as to maintain it at its optimum level while providing sustainable benefits for the present as well as future generations. Some approaches for conservation of forests are as follows :

  1. Afforestation and Reforestation. Afforestation is developing forest over an area where none existed earlier. Reforestation is developing forest cover which has been cleared during exploitation. Degraded forests are also mended to bring them back to health. All this is done by state forest department either by themselves or with the help of joint forest management committees.
  2. Separation of Commercial Forestry. Useful plants required for meeting commercial needs should be planted separately so that there is no undue pressure on natural forests. Social forestry is growing multipurpose plants on village common lands for meeting requirement of fodder, firewood and small timber. Production plantation is growing industry required plants on wastelands.
  3. Controlled grazing.
  4. Prevention of scraping and litter removal.
  5. Practising block cutting or cutting of forest equal to its regeneration capacity.
  6. Building of national parks, sanctuaries and biosphere reserves.

Question 7.
Find out about traditional systems of water harvesting management in your region.
Answer:
Ponds, pools, tanks, lakes, ditches and wetlands. They get filled up during rain. Larger reservoirs are perennial. The smaller ones dry up after a few months. However, both help in recharge of ground water.

Question 8.
Compare the above system with the probable system in hilly/mountainous areas or plains or plateau regions.
Answer:
Hilly/Mountainous Areas. Water is impounded on the slopes, at the base of slope, on the border of ravine or melting snow into tanks called Kulhs, Khatris, Kuls (Himachal Pardesh, J and K), Zabo (Nagaland) and Zings (Ladakh). Water from tanks is used for different purposes—drinking, washing, animals, irrigation.
Plains,

  1. Roof top harvesting of rain water has been in practice since ages in Rajasthan. The collected water is stored below the ground level for later use.
  2. Other methods of water harvesting are specially constructed tanks, Kuis, jhaslars, booris or bers, paar, vivdas, khadins and nadis (Rajasthan), ponds in Kandi belts (Jammu), bhandaras and tals (Maharashtra), bundhis (MP and UP), ahars and pynes (Bihar).
    Plateau. Water is collected in series of tanks through impounding rain water, building check dams and channels from flowing water. They are called eris (Tamil Nadu), surrangams (Kerala) and kattas (Karnataka).

Question 9.
Find out the source of water in your region!locality. Is water from this source available to all people living in that area ?
Answer:
Water is supplied by municipal corporation through pipes. It is obtained from river/canal (if the same happens to be nearby). In many cases piped water is pumped out from ground by tube wells and stored in raised water tanks.
Municipal water supply is not available to all the residents. Many newly built colonies, slums and unauthorised localities are often without the piped water.

NCERT Chapter End Exercises

Question 1.
What changes would you suggest in your home in order to be environment friendly ?
(CBSE AI 2009, CCE 2012, 2014)
Answer:

  1. Judicious use of electricity by switching off lights and electrical appliances not required,
  2. Replacement of incandescent bulbs with fluorescent, compact fluorescent ones and LED bulbs.
  3. Replacement of electricity or gas operated geysers with solar water heaters,
  4. Replacement of electricity generating sets with solar light,
  5. Having more natural light and ventilation with design supporting warming during winters and cooling during summer,
  6. Reducing wastage of water, food and other articles.
  7. Separation of recyclable waste from non-cyclable waste prior to disposal.
  8. Increasing reuse of containers,
  9. Using cloth bags instead of polythene, plastic or paper bags.

Question 2.
Can you suggest some changes in your school which would make it environment friendly ?
Answer:
Yes.

  1. Rainwater harvesting (RWH) by draining roof top rain for underground seepage,
  2. Plantation of trees and shrubs along the boundary for protection against noise and air pollution. Plants will not only provide more oxygen during the school hours but also have a moderating effect on climate.
  3. Prevention of wastage of electricity and water,
  4. Having compost pits for conversion of plant refuse and other biodegradable wastes into useful resource,
  5. Increasing use of solar energy,
  6. Activating ecoclub.

Question 3.
There are four main stakeholders when it comes to forests and wildlife. Which among these should have the authority to decide the management offorest produce ? Why do you think so (CBSE Foreign 2010, CCE 2011)
Answer:
The four stakeholders in forests and wildlife are

  1. People living in and around forests who obtain most of their requirements from forests,
  2. Forest department which owns the forests.
  3. Industrialists who obtain raw materials for their industries,
  4. Wildlife and nature enthusiasts. Among them the persons living in and around the forests have traditional knowledge of how best the forests can be managed so that a sustainable yield can be obtained indefinitely. Therefore, authority for management of forest produce should be handed over to them. However, the forest department must monitor the same so that there is no excessive exploitation.

Question 4.
How can you as an individual contribute or make a difference to the management of
(a) Forests and wildlife
(b) Water resources
(c) Coal and petroleum ?
Answer:
(a) Forests and Wildlife:

  1. I will stress on sustainable use of produce from forests and wildlife,
  2. The area under forest cover has to be increased to control global warming.
  3. Form more joint forest management committees,
  4. Separate commercial forestry from natural forestry.

(b) Water Resources. My major stress will be

  1. Recharging of ground water through rain water harvesting, protection to wetlands and digging sponge pits or wells in the beds of rivulets,
  2. Reducing spoilage of water in agriculture by helping formers to switch over to sprinkler system of irrigation, changing conventional method of rice cultivation with system of rice intensification (SRI),
  3. Judicious use of water for domestic and industrial purposes.

(c) Coal and Petroleum:

  1. Higher level of purification to reduce pollution,
  2. Increased use of solar energy,
  3. More investment to commercialise hydrogen powered transport system.

Question 5.
What can you, as an individual, do to reduce your consumption of various natural resources ?
Answer:
Follow the principle of three Rs, i.e, reduce, recycle, reuse.

Question 6.
List five things you have done over the last one week to
(a) Conserve our natural resources
(b) Increase the pressure on our natural resources ?
Answer:
(a) Conservation of Natural Resources

  1. Reduced consumption of electricity by switching off unwanted fans and bulbs,
  2. Reduced consumption of water by closing the tap to prevent overflow of water in the bucket during taking bath,
  3. Used refills instead of purchasing new pens,
  4. I did not waste food,
  5. I have started going to school by school bus instead of using car.

(b) Increase Pressure on Natural Resources

  1. While reading at night on bed, I fell asleep and forgot to switch off the lights,
  2. While brushing my teeth and later taking bath, I did not close the tap, so a lot of water was wasted,
  3. I left the ball pen uncapped, so the ink dried up. I had to throw three ball pens last week,
  4. I am in the habit of using loose sheets for doing rough work. They are then thrown away,
  5. I bring more food in my tiffin than I eat. Daily I throw a lot of food in the dust bin.

Question 7.
On the basis of environmental issues you studied, what changes would you incorporate in your life style in a move towards a sustainable use of our resources ?
Answer:
1. Follow the principle of three Rs — reduce, recycle and reuse.
2. Undertake tree plantation twice a year during days of Van Mahotsava.
3. Where possible, use of public transport, school, bus and car pools.
4. Use of solar energy for as many purposes as possible.

Selection Type Questions

Alternate Response Type Questions
(True/False, Right(√)/Wrong (x), Yes/No)

Question 1.
Presence of coliform bacteria in a water body indicates contamination by industrial effluents.
Question 2.
An environmentally friendly decision is reuse jam and pickle bottles.
Question 3.
Forests are reservoirs of wildlife.
Question 4.
Chipko andolan originated in Haridwar during 1980s.
Question 5.
Check dams are built along seasonal flooded gullies for water harvesting.
Question 6.
Coal and petroleum are non-renewable inexhaustible resource.
Question 7.
An important protective function of forests is reduction of atmospheric pollution.
Question 8.
Forest department has been able to maintain biodiversity by growing pine, Teak and Eucalyptus on large tracts.

Matching Type Questions

Question 9.
Match the columns I and II (single matching) :

Column I Column II
(a)    Desertification

(b)    Khejri

(c)   Khadin

(d)   Carbon monoxide

(i) Amrita Devi Bishnoi

(ii) Incomplete combustion

(iii)    Deforestation

(iv)   Water harvesting

Question 10.
Match the contents of columns I, II and III (double matching) :

Column I Column II Column III
(a)    Flyash

(b)    Kulhs

(c)    Van Mahotsav

(d)    Water pollution

(i) Coliform count 

(ii) Coal

(iii)     Water harvesting

(iv)     Afforestation

p.  Himachal Pradesh

q. BOD

r. Toxic chemicals

s. February, July

Question 11.
Mark the resource as I (inexhaustible), R (renewable) and N (non-renewable) (key or check list items):

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources 1

Question 12.
Match stimulus with appropriate response.

Water Harvesting Karnataka A Tamil Nadu B Kerala C
(i) Surrangams

(ii) Kattas

(iii) Eris

Fill in the Blanks

Question 13. Forests are ………….. hot spots.
Question 14. Amrita Devi Bishnoi sacrificed her life and that of 363 others in for ……………….. protection of …………….. trees.
Question 15. In blood carbon monoxide forms …………… that is unable to transport oxygen.
Question 16. Ganga runs its course of 2500 km from …………….. in Bay of Bengal.
Question 17. To save energy and prevent warming, I use ……………… instead of incandescent bulbs.

Answers:
NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources image - 1

NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

These Solutions are part of NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science. Here we have given NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
Prepare a list of items that you use daily in the school. Identify from the list five such items that can be recycled.
Answer:
Items. Rexin bag, steel lunch box, steel spoon, steel compass, steel dividers, paper, plastic box, pen, pencil, blade, eraser, handkerchief.
Recycleable Items. Steel lunch box, steel spoon, steel compass, steel dividers, blade, paper, plastic box.

Question 2.
List the advantages associated with water harvesting at the community level. (CCE 2012)
Answer:
Water harvesting at the community level is capturing, collection and storage of rain water and surface run off for filling either small water bodies or recharging ground water. This is carried out through water shed management, check dams, earthen dams, roof top harvesting and filter wells in flood drains.
Benefits:

  1. It ensures water availability in non-rainy season,
  2. It reduces the chances of flooding during rainy season,
  3. Ground water level does not fall as it is regularly recharged,
  4. Ground water recharge is the best form of water harvesting as the water is filtered and free from contaminations. It also does not evaporate,
  5. Water becomes available for drinking as well as irrigation.

Question 3.
In a village in Karnataka people started cultivating crops all around a lake which was always filled with water. They added fertilizers to their field in order to enhance the yield. Soon they discovered that the water body was completely covered with green floating plants and fishes started dying in large numbers.
Analyse the situation and give reasons for excessive growth of plants and death of the fish in the lake.
Answer:
Fertilizer rich run off from fields must have passed into the lake. It caused nutrient enrichment of lake water. The result is excessive growth of algae and other aquatic plants which float on the water surface and produce water bloom. Old dead plants produce a lot of organic matter. The submerged plants are also killed due to shading. BOD of water increases. As more and more oxygen is consumed by decomposers little is left for respiration of aquatic animals. Therefore, fish begin to die. The phenomenon of nutrient enrichment of water body that causes formation of water bloom and subsequent killing of aquatic life is called eutrophication.

Question 4.
What measures would you take to conserve electricity in your house ? (CCE 2012)
Answer:

  1. Judicious use of electricity by switching off lights and electrical appliances not required,
  2. Replacement of incandescent bulbs with fluorescent, compact fluorescent ones and LED bulbs.
  3. Replacement of electricity or gas operated geysers with solar water heaters,
  4. Replacement of electricity generating sets with solar light,
  5. Having more natural light and ventilation with design supporting warming during winters and cooling during summer.

Question 5.
Although coal and petroleum are produced by degradation of biomass, yet we need to conserve them. Why ? (CCE 2012)
Answer:
Coal and petroleum have been produced from large amounts of biomass entrapped inside the earth under high temperature, pressure and anaerobic conditions. Such a situation develops only rarely like big upheavals on earth. At present no more coal or petroleum is being formed. All that is available has been formed millions of years ago. Being rich source of energy, coal and petroleum are being consumed in ever increasing amount in industry, transport, kitchens, etc. If the trend continues, soon they will be exhausted. Therefore, they must be conserved by developing more efficient machines, hybrid engines and using hydrogen as a fuel.

Question 6.
Suggest a few measures for controlling carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.
Answer:

  1. Increasing Vegetation Cover. It will increase utilisation of atmospheric CO2 in photosynthesis.
  2. Seeding of Oceans With Phytoplankton. Increased photosynthetic activity of oceans will result in decreasing CO2 concentration.
  3. Carbonation. CO2 released during combustion should not be allowed to pass into atmosphere. Instead, it can be changed into carbonates.
  4. Alternate Sources of Energy. Instead of fossil fuels, hydrogen fuel and solar energy should be used.
  5. Burning of Litter. Litter and crop residue should not be burnt but instead converted into manure.

Question 7.
(a) Locate and name the water reservoirs in figures (i) and (ii).
(b) Which has advantage over the other and why ?
NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources image - 1
Answer:
(a) Water reservoir in figure (i) is pond while it is underground water body (ground water) in figure (ii).
(b) Ground water is more advantageous than pond water.
For Benefits: 

  1. Prevents flooding,
  2. Checks soil erosion.
  3. Retains water underground and prevents drought,
  4. Increases life of downstream reservoirs and dams,
  5. Higher biomass production and income of water shed community,
  6. Maintenance of ecological balance.

NCERT Exemplar Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Long Answer Questions

Question 8.
In the context of conservation of natural resources, explain the terms reduce, recycle and reuse. From among the materials that we use in daily life, identify two materials for each category.
Answer:
Three Rs — reduce, recycle and reuse.

  1. Reduce: It is to reduce consumption by preventing wastage.
    1. Switching off unnecessary lights, fans and other electrical appliances,
    2. Repair of leaky taps.
    3. Reducing food wastage,
    4. Walking down to nearby market instead of using vehicle.
  2. Recycle: Separation of recyclable wastes from non-recyclable wastes. The former are taken by rag pickers for sending them to industries involved in recycling, e.g., paper, plastic, metal, glass.
  3. Reuse: Carry bags, packing material, plastic containers and other reusable articles should not be thrown away if the same are uncontaminated. For example, plastic bottles and jars containing various food items brought from market can be washed and used for storing things in the kitchen.

Question 9.
Prepare a list of five activities that you perform daily in which natural resources can be conserved or energy utilisation can be minimised.
Answer:

  1. Judicious use of electricity by switching off lights and electrical appliances not required,
  2. Replacement of incandescent bulbs with fluorescent, compact fluorescent ones and LED bulbs.
  3. Replacement of electricity or gas operated geysers with solar water heaters,
  4. Replacement of electricity generating sets with solar light,
  5. Having more natural light and ventilation with design supporting warming during winters and cooling during summer,
  6. Reducing wastage of water, food and other articles.
  7. Separation of recyclable waste from non-cyclable waste prior to disposal.
  8. Increasing reuse of containers,
  9. Using cloth bags instead of polythene, plastic or paper bags.

Question 10.
Is water conservation necessary ? Give reasons.
Answer:

  1. Distribution of fresh water is highly uneven. Large tracts are deficient in rain as well as ground water,
  2. At most places more water is withdrawn from reservoir and underground source than their recharging
  3. Requirement in urban and industrial areas is nearly always higher than the availability,
  4. Further demand for water is rising by 4 – 8% annually in all fields, whether agriculture, industry or domestic use.

Therefore, water conservation is necessary. Wastage of the resource should be prevented. Waste water should be recycled. Water harvesting involving recharging of ground water should be practised.

Question 11.
Suggest a few useful ways of utilising waste water.
Answer:
Waste or used water can also become a resource.

  1. Treated municipal water can be poured in irrigation channels for supply to crop fields,
  2. Treated waste water can be used in urban areas for watering gardens, lawns and washing vehicles,
  3. Industries can treat their waste water and recycle the same,
  4. Waste water passed into ponds recharges the ground water,
  5. Sewage sludge, separated from waste water is a source of manure, compost and biogas.

Question 12.
What is the importance of forests as a resource ?
Answer:
Economic Reasons:

  1. Food: Tribals obtain most of their food requirements from the forests, e.g., fruits, tubers, fleshy roots, leaves.
  2. Nuts: Pine Nut (Chilgoza), Almond, Walnut and Cashewnut are obtained from forests trees.
  3. Spices: Cardamom, Cinnamon, Nutmeg and Cloves are spices obtained from forest plants.
  4. Commercial Products: A number of forest products are of commercial importance, g., rubber, resin, tannins, tendu, lac, cork, camphor, essential oils, soap pod and drugs.
  5. Fuel Wood: Nearly two billion persons depend upon forests for fuel wood.
  6. Timber: Wood for the manufacture of furniture, household fitments and several other articles mostly comes from forests. Bamboo is called poorman’s timber as it is used in thatching huts, preparing baskets and a number of other articles including furniture.
  7. Paper: It is prepared from cellulose rich plants like bamboos, Boswellia, Eucalyptus, grasses and several

Protective Functions:                                                                                  i

  1. Forests provide shelter to wild animals. Over 40 million tribals and villagers live in forests.
  2. Plant roots hold the soil firmly. Vegetation protects the soil from action of wind and water. Forests, therefore, protect the soil from erosion and landslides.
  3. Pollution. Forests reduce atmospheric pollution by absorbing gases, collecting suspended particles and reducing noise.

Regulative Functions:

  1. Absorption and Retention of Water. Forests reduce run off, hold water like a sponge and allow slow percolation to form perennial springs and rivulets.
  2. Forests increase atmospheric humidity, increase frequency of rainfall and moderate temperature.
  3. Atmospheric Gases. Forests absorb large quantity^ of C02 from the atmosphere, reducing the threat of global warming. They also release a lot of oxygen.

Question 13.
Why are Arabari forests of Bengal known to be good example of conserved forests.
Answer:
Regeneration of Sal Forests — An Example of People’s Participation in the Management of Forests Despite best efforts, the West Bengal Forest Department could not revive the degraded Sal forests of Southwestern districts of the state. Excessive surveillance and policing of the degraded forests not only alienated the people but also resulted in frequent clashes between villagers and forest officials. This also fueled the militant peasant movement led by Naxalites. Realising the failure, the forest department revised its strategy in 1972. It allowed forest officer A.K. Banerjee of Arabari forest range of Midnapore to involve villagers in regeneration of 1272 hectares of badly degraded Sal forest. Banerjee provided employment to villagers in silviculture (cultivation of trees) and harvesting, 25% of final harvest and allowed collection of fuel wood as well as fodder at nominal fee. By 1983, the Arabari forest had been revived and was then valued at 12-5 crores.

Value Based Questions in Science for Class 10 Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

Question 1.
Your father has a car. He can also afford to hire a driver. Even then he sends you in school bus. What is the rationale behind it ?
Answer:
It is saving on natural resources for which your father insists on your going to school in the school bus. The bus has to make trip to school. There will be no extra gasoline consumption if you go to school in the bus. Going by car will consume gasoline. If every student who can afford goes in a car, the consumption of gasoline will go up several times. It is because of this reason that many offices maintain cabs for bringing the employees to the work place. It is just similar to our campaign to save electricity (by putting off light and gadgets not in use) or water (by turning off the tap when water is not required).

Question 2.
CFL is quite costly as compared to incandescent electric bulb. Even then we read that incandescent bulbs should be replaced by CFLs. Why so ?
Answer:
CFL or compact fluorescent lamp consumes one fifth of energy as compared to incandescent bulb. It also produces less heat and is therefore, environmental friendly. The extra money spent on purchasing a CFL will be recovered in the form of lesser energy bill for the consumer. Use of CFLs will help in less consumption of the resource resulting in its greater availability.

Question 3.
What is the social impact of technique developed by Rajinder Singh in Rajasthan ?
Answer:
Rajinder Singh, popularly known as “Water Man of Rajasthan” developed the technique of underground dams for storing run off and rain water. They were connected to surface water tanks as well as crop fields by means of underground channels. The stored water is used for irrigating crop fields throughout the year in areas where water availability is scarce even for drinking.

Question 4.
Your school keeps dust/garbage bins at many places outside the class rooms where the students and the teachers can dump their waste food, waste paper, used pens, pencil shavings, plastic bags, aluminium foils, empty mineral water bottles, etc. The garbage bins are emptied by the school sweeper in larger container of municipal committee for taking away to dumping ground. What improvement would you suggest ?
Answer:
Instead of common garbage bin, I will suggest keeping of two bins, green bin for easily biodegradable articles like waste food, and blue bin for slow decaying and nonbiodegradable articles. The green bins should not be emptied in the container of municipal committee but in a pit inside the school campus for preparing manure for the plants. The blue bins could be emptied in the municipal committee container.
While discussing about coal and petroleum, a teacher told the students about PCRA’s (Petroleum Conserva¬tion Research Association) guidelines to save the fossil fuels while driving vehicles. Deepa was going to her school with her mother who was driving car. At the traffic signal, when the light was red, Deepa suggested her mother to switch off the engine.

Question 5.
After reading the above passage, answer the following questions :
(a) Fossil fuels are natural reserves, then why we need to conseve them ?
(b) List any two ways of saving the fossil fuels
(c) State two values exhibited by Deepa. (CBSE Foreign 2016)
Answer:
(a) Fossil fuels take millions of years for their formation. Their present stock is limited and hence exhaustible. They should be conserved to provide for their availability for future generations.
(b)

  1. Using public transport
  2. Walking short distances.
  3. Use of fuel efficient technology in vehicles.

(c) Deepa exhibited concern for

  1. Conservation of natural resource,
  2. Reduction in environmental pollution
  3. Assertion for global cause.

Question 6.
The activities of man had adverse effects on all forms of living organisms in the biosphere. Unlimited exploi¬tation of nature by man disturbed the delicate ecological balance between the living and nonliving compo¬nents of the biosphere. The unfavourable conditions created by man himself threatened the survival not only of himself but also of the entire living organisms on the mother earth. One of your classmates is an active member of “Eco Club” of your school which is creating environmental awareness amongst the school students, spreading the same in the society and also working hard for preventing ènvironmental degradation of the surroundings.
(a) Why is it necessary to conserve our environment ?
(b) State the importance of green and blue dust bins in the safe disposal of house hold waste.
(c) List two values exhibited by your classmate who is an active member of Eco Club of your school.  (CBSE A.I. 2016)
Answer:
(a) Conservation of Environment:

  1. Protection of air, soil and biota from pollutants,
  2. Maintenance of ecological balance,

(b) Importance of Green Blue Dust Bins. Green dust bins are meant for putting in biodegradable wastes while blue dust bins are used for non-biodegradable wastes. Segregation of the two types of wastes and putting them in separate dust bins helps in quicker disposal of wastes,
(c) Values Shown by Classmate:

  1. Concern for cleanliness of the surroundings.
  2. Quicker and proper disposal of wastes.
  3. Concern for environment.
  4. Civic sense.

HOTS Questions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

Question 1.
What does the figure depict ? Identify A, B and C.
Answer:
Caption: Khadin system of water harvesting.
A – Catchment area
B – Khadin (cropped area)
C – Khadin bund
HOTS Questions for Class 10 Science Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources image - 1

Question 2.
Why is forest called biodiversity hotspot ?
Answer:
A biodiversity hotspot is an area having a large number of endemic species which are being threatened with extinction. Because of long exploitation of forest resources and pressure from industrialists, the natural biota is being replaced by commercially required trees.

Question 3.
What is Kattas ?
Answer:
It is a water storage system of Karnataka that involves raising an embankment over a draining line.

Question 4.
What is production plantation ?
Answer:
It is growing of commercially important plants over separate piece of land, generally a wasteland.

Question 5.
With the help of an example show that reuse strategy is better than recycling. (CBSE A.I. 2010, CCE 2011)
Answer:
Reuse is better than recycling as

  1. There is no need to send the used article to recycling unit,
  2. There is no consumption of energy as required for recycling.
  3. There is no need to remarket the produce. Instead of throwing away the used one and obtaining a new one after its recycling, a container or bottle can be reused several times, of course, each time after cleaning the same. This will save a lot of money and energy.

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